1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

2003 F350 SRW 4x4 V10 service truck $4800

Discussion in 'Used Plowing and Truck Equipment Forum' started by got-h2o, Jan 12, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    As it states. This is an ex rail truck and has been very well FORD maintained. My buddie bought this trucks twin and loves it. His had many new parts, tires, etc. No rail gear and inverted 19.5's. His had strobe lights, switch panel, etc. I can't confirm this truck does, but assume so.

    Power windows and locks, 274k miles. VIN 1FDSF31S33EA52234

    Bear in mind, rail miles are nothing like road miles. They are on the rails 75% of the time and usually the rest is travel back to home base. A lot of the rail time is hooked to a train being pulled as well.

    Like I said, my buddie loves his. He wants this one, as do I, but $$ isn't right at this point. Otherwise I wouldn't hesitate to buy it. He traded his service bed for a regular bed, found a nice used bumper, and put in a set of old composite lights I had in it. He also put a set of 05 take offs, and only had to buy the cheap 1/4" spacers. 99-04 wheels will bolt right up. He sold the 19.5's for the same price he paid for the replacements. He then did a garage paint job himself b/c the bed didn't match anyway.

    Give me your Email for the rest of the pics. It's a blanketed dealer email with thumbnail pics. Here is one pic, as well my buddies twin truck.

    Price for the rail truck is $4800 plus IN sales tax. We all know this is worth much more. My other buddie is a dealer and isn't greedy. The other truck isn't for sale, pic just for reference.

    [​IMG]


    The twin finished:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. woodchuck2

    woodchuck2 Senior Member
    Messages: 304

    I am surprised he needed spacers for the stock wheels. When i worked for the railroad most trucks were stock and they just stuck dually wheels on them turned in and most trucks were close to the right width. If not then they ordered the wheels with the correct offset.
     
  3. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    The spacers are b/c he used 05 wheels on an 03. Coil spring front to leaf front. That's why.....nothing to do with it being a RR truck ;)
     
  4. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    That's also why the rear caps are cut out.......................
     
  5. Maine_Train

    Maine_Train Senior Member
    Messages: 462

    Say what?
    The "on the rails 75% of the time" figure will probably vary according to the purpose of the vehicle, what company owns it, etc., but the rest of the statements in the first two sentences are probably accurate. But I have never seen or heard of a highway/rail-capable vehicle being "hooked to a train." I'm not sure if there are any Federal Railroad Administration rules about that, but it just doesn't sound right to me.
    If someone has a photo or other evidence to the contrary, I'd like to see it.

    I'd love to own a "Hy-Rail®" truck (even if I couldn't plow snow with it), but I know most of 'em aren't exactly "cherry" when their first owner trades them in. "Miles is miles," and 274K is a lotta miles.
     
  6. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    Miles isn't miles. Resale wise maybe, but to the trained eye not so much. The suspension is NOT getting used on the rails. That's huge for the typical Ford front end issues. I was told about the hooked up to the train thing...........this was when I asked what was up with the front bumper that's no longer on it. It was obviously designed to be hooked or towed some way or the other, whether on the road or the rails. If it is towed on 4 wheels, it was probably running in nuetral to save the trans, thus still adding up miles whether it was being driven or not.

    Come drive it, then drive a road driven truck with the same miles and tell me they ran and drove the same. It won't happen. I've driven the one, it runs, drives, and looks like 50k compared to most of the road driven trucks in my area. This is down to engine appearance, exhaust manifold bolts, etc. I work on work trucks, trust me, there's a difference. Not to mention I'd take a V10 over a 5.4 ANY DAY. My buddie has 8 trucks in his fleet and this is his favorite one, and the one he drives himself.

    Lastly, this is a $6-8k truck ALL day long. If you're interested, come see it. If not, please don't accuse me of trying to misrepresent the truck. I just relayed what I was told, and it made sense to me. I'm not sitting on this truck, nor do I have $$ in it. I am a wholesale buyer and thought maybe someone here would be interested in a good deal. The last V10 1 ton Ford truck I listed here got tons of interest and it sold before anyone here could even look at it. This one is still available to my knowledge, but probably won't be for long.
     
  7. Maine_Train

    Maine_Train Senior Member
    Messages: 462

    I'm not accusing you of trying to misrepresent it, but it might have been good for you to confirm what you were told about a highway/rail truck being towed around by a train before posting it in an open forum. It did seem like an attempt to minimize or "gloss over" the high mileage on that truck. (And most railroad-owned vehicles have very high mileage when they're sold off, regardless of where/how the miles were racked up.)

    The front bumpers are removed from a lot of road/rail trucks so that the gear can be raised when they're "on the rubber." (As in the pic in your original post.) Without a rigid drawbar (coupler)--no chains--there's no safe way for it to be moved by a train. The coupler would have to be mounted higher than the bumper in order to properly connect with whatever was "towing" the truck.

    If whoever told you that wasn't just "pulling your leg," they might have seen a dump truck or similar large maintenance-of-way vehicle with a coupler or couplers on it. That's so that a big (as in BIG) enough truck can move a railcar while the truck and its crew works on the track.

    Unless the next owner has legal access to a track, and a need to run on the track, they'd probably be better off removing and selling the rail gear, anyway. It doesn't do much for handling, fuel MPG, or finding a place to park. :wink:

    Thanks for the offer to come see it, but when I go looking for a "Hy-Rail®" truck, there's a place just one state over from here that has a larger selection. They can also inspect and recertify the rail gear to FRA standards, so the vehicle could be run "on the iron." From the one pic, it does look to be in good shape, and looks like it's got potential for more miles/years of work.

    And hey, no charge for the bump to your thread. I hope it finds a good home. :D
     
  8. got-h2o

    got-h2o 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,439

    Thanks for the bump. BUT I saw the bumper with my own eyes. I had a pic of the one on my phone, I'll try to dig it up. It was a big fabbed up SOB, something that would have worked with the gear. And no one was blowing smoke to me......it's my buddie who I buy through and has dealt in thousands of trucks. Not as if he's trying to pawn it off on me......he doesn't even know I listed it to sell. And to clear it up, I hope you didn't think I meant that the truck pulled anything, I meant that the truck was towed with something.

    As for the high mile RR truck thing, not so much. There's another RR company around here that sells their trucks after around 20-30k after they are completely destroyed. Some of those trucks are on their 3rd and 4th trans, all diesels, all 2wd's, and not a straight square inch of body panel on them. This truck was obviously used differently.

    It's funny, I can sell a complete POS low miled truck in a second, everyone gets scared when they hear higher numbers. My highest miled personal truck has 374k. I've had so many 2-300k miled trucks I couldn't even count them. I flipped a 30k mile 93 Chevy 2 years ago that you couldn't give me if I had to keep it b/c it was so rusty underneath.

    I wish the gear was still on it. My other buddie has a fleet/lscp customer with a few rail trucks. They use them for spraying. They would buy this in a second if it was set up.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.