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2 ton truck advice wanted

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by xtreem3d, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    evening guys,
    looking at possibly buying a big dump truck but don't know much about them. i guess i would like 4 wheel disc brakes and auto trans, diesel engine other than that i don't know what to consider or why the things listed might be a bad idea...can any of you who own big dumps help out? i'd be looking at used ones and don't know the cut off years when auto's or 4 whl disc brakes may have started so they may wind up being out of my price range anyway,
    tia,
    steve
     
  2. CGM Inc.

    CGM Inc. PlowSite Veteran
    from Ontario
    Messages: 3,590

    Whats your budget?
     
  3. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    why an auto?


    and what do you mean by 2 ton?
    like a F450/F550 style truck?

    and yeah, what's your budget?

    and what are you doing with it?
     
  4. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    an auto for possibly plowing but mostly hauling skid loaders and track hoe, and material, keep from guys burning up clutches..i guess what i'm calling a 2 ton truck would be something like a ford f-700...budget would be up to about 18000.00
     
  5. clark lawn

    clark lawn PlowSite.com Addict
    from NE ohio
    Messages: 1,233

    you can change alot of clutches for the price of an auto. on bigger trucks they run drum brakes all the way around ( at least if you have air)
     
  6. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    here is one i looked at 98 c7500 , cat motor, 6 speed manual, 4 whl disc, hydraulic brakes, 83,000 mi, motor never been apart starting at 15,000.00 obo haven't heard back about air, pw, ect
     
  7. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    Ok a 7500 is 25950 to 37,000 GVW
    Typically what they call a class 7. (although you could spec it as a class 6, just under 26k)

    THIS IS A BIG HEAVY TRUCK.

    air brakes kick butt, hydraulic brakes are terrible on trucks this size.
    Even spec'd at 25,950, to tow just about anything you'll need a CDL (in some states, you need it even then, check your own state).

    Since you need a CDL anyway, you get the air brakes endorsement and don't mess around. Almost all 90+% big trucks have drum air brakes and they work alarmingly well. (my fully loaded semi can outstop your F350 with 14k trailer on the back). Also, because these are the most common parts are much cheaper and easier to get.

    Of course, in most states (again, check FMCSA website) you'll need USDOT # and all that entails (medical cards, drug testing random and pre-employment, paperwork, annual inspections, etc, etc, etc)

    Most auto's on this class are pretty good now, but 10 years ago were ok at best and they don't last all that long. And remember, anything on a big truck is VERY expensive. Just overbuilt like crazy. And auto's aren't the big thing so you're looking at more money than a standard. Plus auto's get worse fuel mileage, esp on these big guys and older transmissions.

    You aren't going to be backing up much in a truck this size, you'll run right over little Johnny. You go forward and plow roads or great big lots where you go around and around.

    I forgot the best thing. Registering the truck. OUTRAGEOUS. Here in Colorado (which is expensive a pickup truck is about $400), figure about $2000, PER YEAR.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
  8. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    thanks...that's the kind of info i'm looking for ..... so would you say even hydraulic 4 wheel disc brakes wouldn't be that good? if you can't tell already i'm really concerned about stopping power in whatever truck i get,
    steve
     
  9. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    air brakes kick a$$
    I"m not kidding on the stopping distance on a big semi, it's pretty amazing for so much weight.

    once you go air, you won't ever go back.

    You do, of course, need the CDL with air, but that's no big deal. heck, they let me have one. :eek:

    My tree guy has a 18k GVW LCF (isuzu something) but it's got air brakes, it's pretty nice.
     
  10. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    :nono:.....
     
  11. Cat Man 77

    Cat Man 77 Member
    Messages: 69

    As long as you buy a truck with a GVWR of 26,000 or under there is no need for a CDL, all that is needed is a medical card. And you can tow a 10,000 LBS trailer with no issue. basically the truck and trailer can weigh a total of 36,000 lbs. And this is possible because of a loop-hole. No CDL is needed for a vechicle with a GVWR of 26,000, but if it GVWR is 26,001 a CDL is needed. The same applies with the trailer, as long as it's GVWR is 10,000 or under you are fine, but if it's GVWR is 10,001 a CDL is required. All that would be required is a Class C license with a Air Brake endorsement. BTW i would recommend a 26,000 GVWR vehicle with air brakes because you can buy a tag along trailer and tow your backhoe, dozer, or whatever. But i would keep a copy of the law of in the truck to show any ball-buster cop.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
  12. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    You dont need a CDL for a 10K plus trailer:salute:
     
  13. Cat Man 77

    Cat Man 77 Member
    Messages: 69

    in my state a CDL is required for a 10,001 GVWR trailer.
     
  14. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    But CDL requirements are the same for all the states
     
  15. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    Sorry for the hijack

    Air would be preferred but we use a old muni truck with hydraulic brakes and it gets the job done just fine also
     
  16. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member
    Messages: 374

    This came right out of my CDL book for CDL A

    " gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of more than 26,000 lbs provided that the gross vehicle weight rating ( GVWR) or gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of any vehicle being towed is more than 10,000lbs"

    NY you need a CDL A for any trailer over 10k and CDL B for any truck over 26k. No mention of air but any truck over 26k should have air and you need a air endorsement if it does have air. A truck under 26k with air :dizzy:


    So again any truck and trailer over 26k or any trailer over 10k CDL A

    If you tow your 6 ton trailer with your F350 you need a CDL A
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
  17. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    i don't own anything with air brakes so what's the "trick" with air that you need the special license

    EDIT...also what about split rear ends? are they old school?..i haven't seen many newer trucks list them, pros/cons?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2009
  18. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    There are some differences, but the main one is that air brakes fail on.

    regular hydraulic brakes fail off. If you get a cut in a line, you have no brakes, there's no pressure left in the line.

    air brakes fail on. If you get a cut in the line, lose air pressure, etc, the brakes are fully applied and locked on. (spring brakes, systems older than the mid 1970's on trailers may not work this way)

    You don't pump air brakes (because you'll lose air pressure each time you do it)

    You don't just drive off, you have to let air pressure build (couple minutes typically)

    the braking power is tremendous though.
     
  19. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    Johm Mac and Cat Man77

    Classes of License:

    The Federal standard requires States to issue a CDL to drivers according to the following license classifications:

    Class A -- Any combination of vehicles with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

    Class B -- Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR.

    Class C -- Any single vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of Class A or Class B, but is either designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver, or is placarded for hazardous materials.

    This is from the federal website

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration-licensing/cdl/cdl.htm
     
  20. John Mac

    John Mac Senior Member
    Messages: 374

    Crete, you wrote:
    The law as you wrote it is:
    Explain?