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1990 Chevy 1/2 ton Overheating problem

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by tough85bronco, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. tough85bronco

    tough85bronco Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    I am new to setting up and owning my own truck plow! I picked up a older hiniker 9' straight blade. I put it on my half ton after cranking the torsion bars a bit and it is not to bad of fit and the weight issue is not terrible! I do however have a issue with the truck overheating with the plow on! It is about 50 degrees out and today I put a 180 degree thermostat and a Solid flex fan(Reverse rotation to match factory) instead of a fan clutch set up! It still overheats as I drive! When I pull over and put the truck in park it comes down slowly unless I rev the engine then it comes down fast! Even downhill in neutral it continues to heat up! Only cools down in park! Anyone have any ideas? Is it just to warm outside to drive with it on? Thanks
    Ryan
     
  2. sechracer

    sechracer Senior Member
    Messages: 478

    angle and or drop the blade a little. he plow is blocking the wind from hitting the radiator...
     
  3. tough85bronco

    tough85bronco Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    did that, 1" off the ground angled left or right made no difference
     
  4. JoeCool

    JoeCool Senior Member
    from Canada
    Messages: 214

    The rad just doesn't have the capacity to cool it anymore. Flushing might work or re-core it.
     
  5. tough85bronco

    tough85bronco Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    what about grabbing a good 3 core out of a 3/4 ton?
     
  6. plowinginma

    plowinginma Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 326

    straight is the best way to deal with over heating.. In my opinion..And it is rather warm out..
     
  7. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Read your trucks owners manual they state low and angled.

    I run around with a blade on all year long make some longer drives and play with the temps. angled and low as by far the best for moving air. turning the heater on high works well for dissipating a few BTUs as well.
     
  8. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    Check the shroud to need a heavy duty fan ,something like this.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. ETMegabyte

    ETMegabyte Member
    Messages: 41

    I had this problem in my old '88 2500. Even with the heavy-duty fan. My solution was to add a secondary electric fan on the left side of the radiator, and keep the plow angled to the right when driving. With the electric fan on, and the plow angled, my overheat problem went away and has stayed away...

    I've also heard others mention that adding an air scoop below the front bumper angled to move air from below the plow blowing up into the front of the radiator helps as well, but with my electric fan, I never had to do that...

    One thing to keep in mind is that you have a huge plow blade. 9 feet! sheesh. Even angled, there's no direct line from the front of your truck into the radiator. My '88 only had a 7.5 foot blade, so keeping it angled helped me quite a bit. My gut instinct tells me that you'll probably have to go with the air scoop thing, either from under the bumper blowing up into the radiator, or from the top blowing down into the front of the radiator... You can test the theory by putting a piece of plywood or something similar from where the hood and the grille meet, leaning forward onto the top of your plow frame, which will direct air down into there as you drive. Keep your blade straight, and MAKE SURE THAT PIECE OF WOOD IS SECURE so it doesn't blow off as you drive... See if your overheating problem goes away. If it does, then make something a little more permanent...
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  10. plowinginma

    plowinginma Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 326

    Ummm.. I respectfully disagree with you... Low I agree with ... on an angle I do not...for cooling that is... And the geometry of most plows causes you to raise the plow higher when angled so it does not scrape while driving... They may say to angle your plow to not get sucked into a snow bank.. I have seen people angle there plow to get sucked into a bank.. so it must be in the manual ...I honestly have never read the owners manual..however the next time I am sitting in my truck with nothing to do I will look that up..
     
  11. Blaine4450

    Blaine4450 Member
    Messages: 32

    Just wondering if you have checked your coolant level.
     
  12. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    :eek:Have you read your plow manual? take a 100 mile drive with your plow on in the summer months, watch the engine temps and the outside ambient air temperature. then start moving the plow to different heights and angle and watch what the gages tell you. I've done it dozen of times over the years. They run cooler if the blade is carried low and angled.
     
  13. ETMegabyte

    ETMegabyte Member
    Messages: 41

    In theory, angled helps. By shifting the angle to the right, you're moving air in the front of the plow to the right instead of having blunt head-on wind. And, air moving to the right in front of the plow will cause air behind the plow to also move to the right. Oh, and an added bonus is that now you don't have blunt head-on wind into the plow, which makes the engine work less as well... Though I notice that the truck pulls to the left if the plow is angled to the right. Go figure...

    Anyway, add that thought with the fact that a plow angled to the right has the left side of the plow farther away from the radiator, allowing more air to get in behind it.

    Now you're getting more air behind the plow, which is now moving from the left edge of the plow towards the right (since all the air in general is going to move in a similar direction both in front of the plow and behind the plow), putting more cool fresh air where it needs to be, right next to the radiator...

    At least that's my understanding of it. I don't know the physics behind it, but I know it works. I do know for a fact that even with the electric fan, on long highway runs, my old truck still gets warmer than I like if I keep the blade straight (though it doesn't overheat as long as my electric fan is on), but angled to the right, the temp stays right where it's supposed to.

    That's my $.02
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  14. plowinginma

    plowinginma Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 326

    I honestly have never taken my plow for a drive in the summer... I actually don't think you are allowed to do such a thing.. Sate law here.. I have never read that either.. And I never read the insurance binder cover to cover.. but I don't think you are covered if you are in an accident..

    And I will be sure to ask next time I am at fisher for the yearly mechanics update...I am sure they will have a great answer.. I will take notes..and get back to you..
     
  15. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    When Basher drives down to the submarine races during the summer he brings it along just in case he needs to plow something.
     
  16. ETMegabyte

    ETMegabyte Member
    Messages: 41

    I know MA is screwed up, but there's no way that a state law could be passed disallowing a plow to be carried in the Summer months. If there were, how would people get their plow worked on? How would you buy a plow truck in the summer (when they're cheaper)? No way. That wouldn't fly.

    I think it's that everyone takes them off because they kill gas mileage and cause excess wear and tear on the truck, not because of a law...
     
  17. MeeksCo

    MeeksCo Senior Member
    Messages: 214

    adding a stationairy or a plastic snow guard to the top of your plow will keep the wind hitting it going down and the wind above it continue to go straight into your radiator.
    I always keep my plow straight and low when driving. Must keep eye on road to make sure there are no bumps/holes/whatever...if so, you have to raise it and drop it again but...that seems to work for me.

    The old 'turn your heater on full blast' trick still works. Turn it on defrost and roll both windows down a few inches and it should flow the heat out of the cabin.

    Everybody's radiator, plow, truck, thermostat, fan, driver, preferences are different. It's a matter of taking opinions, testing them, and finding the median to where it works.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  18. plowinginma

    plowinginma Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 326

    I know for a fact ..the law states.. you can't have the head gear on the truck.. It was one of the driving force towards removable mount plows..(I almost want to say it is a fedral DOT law) and also why everyone would take the gear off in the summer... I hate to actually go look this crap up..so maybe someone??? Has had there plow on, going to a submarine race and got in an accident while driving there with the plow angled to the left while overheating... and while exchanging papers had the DOT come by and clarified the situation?? anyone?
     
  19. plowinginma

    plowinginma Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 326

  20. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    How do you stay proficient at operating your plow if you do not practice regularly? Plus the truck works better if you keep it conditioned. if you allow it to operate all summer with-out being attached the truck suspension loses it's "memory" and takes a while to start operating properly:rolleyes: I'm a dealer, I take blades to trade shows, demos, touch a truck, etc . Factory reps travel with blades installed 24/7 365 there is no law against it.