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1978 DSO production numbers

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by 3+3, May 20, 2003.

  1. 3+3

    3+3 Junior Member
    Messages: 2

    I recently bought a 1978 DSO Chev Pick'em up... The problem I think I'm about to have is turning it back to 12 volt system...This certain vehicle was owned by the Canadian Armed Forces and they have it wired at 24 volts which in my area is hard to find certain parts for... Is it worth running a 12 volt system,or keeping with the 24 volts?? This truck was a steal, it's a straight cab,1 ton plus, 203 Trans with I believe Dana 44 fronts,rears,low gears, so I'm assuming 4:10, 350 CID... It's still in OD Green paint,unit number on the glove box,rifle holder in between the seats, 5 way lighting system, headlights on,taillights off,tailights on,headlights off etc...Not bad for $700 cdn and I drove her home...

    Ahhh yes, one more question, where do I find info on production numbers for DSO vehicles??
     
  2. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Welcome to plowsite :waving:

    It's not too hard to convert it back to 12V,as there are tons of parts available for those trucks.You'll need a battery,alt,starter,blower motor,new bulbs,etc.Not sure what they do for the distributor,but it may have to be replaced as well to run on 12V.It might be easier to buy a donor truck,and swap everything over.

    The truck should have a D60 front axle,and a 14 bolt FF rear.

    For lots of good info on your truck,check out the link below.

    Chucks Chevy Truck Pages

    BTW If you decide you don't want to convert it,and maybe want to sell it,I'm looking for a truck like that.Let me know if your interested in selling it.
     
  3. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    Can't help you on production numbers, because GM likes to lump all their models together when they give annual sales figures....

    As far as the 24v, it is common only for the engine / ignition to be wired 24v, and the rest of the vehicle to be 12v. Not to doubt you, but have you checked to be sure the whole truck is 24v?

    Here is a web site dedicated to Military vehicles.

    http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Highway/3969/cucvpage.htm

    There are many links on it, to specific military vehicle sites too.

    ~Chuck
    (Thanks for the web site plug Chris!)
     
  4. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    I found an excellent article on converting 24v military GM vehicles to 12v. As I thought, only the starter itself is 24v. Everything else on the truck is 12v. They give detailed instructions including VERY detailed photos of the whole conversion. As a result of the photos and detail, hte file is 1.46 MB. It is a .pdf, so it opens with Adobe Acrobat. You may think the web page is hanging up, but it is just loading the 1MB+ file. I saved it to my hard drive for future reference. Pelican, you might want to check out this site, as they converted this truck for firefighting. They are a truck upfitter.

    Here's the conversion:

    http://www.roscommonequipmentcenter.com/news_notes/nn10.pdf

    Here's the link to their home page for anyone interested. Definitely worth a long look IMO.

    http://www.roscommonequipmentcenter.com

    ~Chuck
     
  5. 3+3

    3+3 Junior Member
    Messages: 2

    Only the starter is 24 volt, perfect..Thanks for the info..
    As for selling it, I think I'll pass but if you're still interested I should be able to get my hands on a few more, I know 2 of them are straight cabs,and 3 are crew cabs,4x4,duallies.. I'm looking at buying 1 of the 3+3, with a price tag of under $1000, they all run and can be driven home, the down side is they are up in Swastika,Ontario...

    So if anyone is interested,just let me know.... Thank you gentlemen..
     
  6. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Well,I learned something then,as I though most of the electrical equipment would be 24 Volts.I think the alternator must still be 24 V though,otherwise it would have no way of charging the batteries ?
     
  7. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    Chris, download the .pdf file I posted the link to above. It is well worth it.
    This is from the .pdf file:

    "The M1008/M1009 were originally designed for civilian use, their heritage includes a 12-volt electric system. The military, of course, uses 24-volt electric appliances. Because of this, General Motors made some changes to the electrical systems of these military models. There are two alternators and two batteries, each of which is 12-volt. The alternators and batteries are connected in series to create 24-volts. The driver's side alternator charges the vehicle's front battery. This battery and alternator supply power for all the 12-volt components/systems. Both alternators charge the rear battery. The electrical system of the M1008/M1009 is a civilian 12-volt system modified to allow 24-volt starting and supply 24-volts for military accessories. The only true 24-volt component is the starter motor."

    They include step by step instructions to convert to 12 volt, and 12 volt with two seperate electrical systems too. Nice article.

    ~Chuck
     
  8. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I knew they had do something to get 24 V,dual alts would do the trick nicely.

    I had not downloaded the file as I'm only on dialup at the office,and it takes forever :realmad:

    Now that i'm home,i'll take a look at it.

    That would make a sweet setup with dual batts and alts,with two separate systems.