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  #81  
Old 10-20-2011, 08:25 AM
turfguy83 turfguy83 is offline
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Location: Dallas, Texas
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Has anyone ever come up with production rates? and then we can input our own cost? I use bidding matrices like this for Annual Landscape Maintenance.
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  #82  
Old 10-20-2011, 08:30 AM
turfguy83 turfguy83 is offline
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Location: Dallas, Texas
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Has anyone ever come up with production rates? i use a bidding matrix for my Annual Landscape Mainteance estimating. based on a per sq foot basis, or linear feet, etc.


example:
How long does it take one truck with a 6'6" blade to push 1000sq feet?
How long does it take one man to walk a spreader 1000sq feet?

things like that. then i could input my own overhead and material costs
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  #83  
Old 10-22-2011, 07:27 AM
cvilleblade cvilleblade is offline
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Landscaping Success Package

Hi Sean,

Your Landscaping Success Guide looks really impressive.

We do more hard landscaping (patios, driveways, stone walls etc.) and I was wondering if the guide covers that part of the industry as well? Or is it mostly concerned with lawn care and more greener activities?

Thanks and thank you for all the hard work.

Lawrence
Sutton, Quebec
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  #84  
Old 11-14-2011, 01:32 PM
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Red02F250 Red02F250 is offline
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Looking for a little help. I've been pushing for 12 years, mostly municipally, with 3/4 ton trucks up 20 ton trucks. Now, just on the side with my own truck, I usually sub-contract and do well with that. I've also done a small HOA near my house for the last 5 years, just on a verbal agreement (I know how risky and stupid that could have been) but now they have asked me to submit a bid for contract.

They're asking for a "per push" quote, which I've never done. I've charged previously by the hour, starting off at $85/hr for up to 5" and increasing by 15-25% for deeper snows. Its a few small alleys with parking, a small parking area (~1/2 acre) and a few short streets. It usually takes 45-60 min for a thorough push and cleaning up the parking area and cul de sacs. The quote that's requested is for each push after 3" has accumulated (measured by the contractor). Anyone have a good suggested range for me? Thanks in advance.
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  #85  
Old 11-14-2011, 01:45 PM
3diamonds 3diamonds is offline
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Why just charge them $85 then. Wala!

Last edited by 3diamonds; 11-14-2011 at 01:48 PM.
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  #86  
Old 11-14-2011, 01:47 PM
3diamonds 3diamonds is offline
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Why just charge them $85 then. Wala!

Its' seem no one wants to help with actual Prices on here.
Why is that?
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  #87  
Old 11-14-2011, 02:57 PM
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Red02F250 Red02F250 is offline
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That would seem too easy!
I haven't charged more because these are essentially my neighbors and I'm not trying to screw them, but I know I could profit more. If I continue, I'll be getting insurance which will increase my cost thus increasing my rate. I also had a jerk accuse me of hitting his old beat up truck last year and filed a police report. I had to show him that my red truck had no damage, couldn't have left white paint transfer on his green truck and the tire tracks in the snow didn't match before he believed me. So if I'm going to put up with that, I'm going to be paid for it. I also want to have an acceptable bid.
Maybe I'll just see if the company I sub for is interested in it.
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  #88  
Old 11-14-2011, 04:18 PM
3diamonds 3diamonds is offline
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it is that easy "dont give up"
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  #89  
Old 11-15-2011, 06:57 AM
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Red02F250 Red02F250 is offline
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To quote Joe Dirt, I'll just "Keep on keepin on." Haha! Thanks for the encouragement!
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  #90  
Old 12-12-2011, 09:40 PM
castlerock1 castlerock1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mick View Post
Very rarely are you going to bid by area, until you start bidding lots by the acre. There are three basic methods to bidding - Hourly, per push and seasonal. Most common is per push which I would recommend for you until you've got some experience. All methods are based on "hourly" or "how long will this take and how much do I want to make for the time spent?". Very generally, $125 an hour is common for plowing with a 7 1/2' plow with some expierence. Since most driveways, etc, take much less than an hour, you simply prorate. Don't forget "drive time" to and from the job. I bid each job as if it were the only one in the area. It's common to lose/gain jobs throughout the year, so you want to make it worthwhile if this were the only job in the neighborhood. Getting anything close to accurate estimating takes time and experience, so don't get discouraged if that "15 minute" job turns into 25 or 30. Just chaulk it up to experience. Make sure you charge more for larger amounts. A common range is 3" - 6", 6" - 9", 9" -12" and "over 12".

Hourly is common in some places, but you would want to keep a low rate at first. Efficient plowing is an art coupled with experience. Customers would get rather upset at a beginner charging $125/hr. Seasonal contracts are best left alone until you get some customers willing to commit to three-year contracts and you get good at estimating.

This might get you started thinking, then do a "Search" using "bidding" as a keyword.
Why you guys looking any further when this guy Mick said it best. Last year was my first year for plowing. I started with 4 hours of sub-contract work for a big landscaping company of which I know the owner. They have 40, 1 ton+ trucks on the road with plows and run 20 extra trucks, skid steers, salters and sidewalk crews. But anyway it gave me a good idea of how long it takes me to do a commercial lot and that info was invaluable.
The truth is, you can charge whatever you want, but try not to shortchange yourself cause you'll find it's not worth it but use common sense. If 5 of your neighbors want their drives cleaned, give them a break in price cause you have no drive time. Also try not to be the most expensive when getting your foot in the door. This year I had the oppurtunity to bid on four nice commercial accounts. I only got 1. I was 30% higher than the bigger companies, but I wrote those prices down and now I have a general idea of what the bigger guys are bidding. Also you have to remember on most commercial you are salting as well and right there is added income. hope this helps.
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  #91  
Old 01-08-2012, 03:57 PM
bigboss1977 bigboss1977 is offline
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Bids

I guess every area in the united states has there own prices for there area. In my area I've seen people charge from any where from $45.00 to $150.00 per hour/push and more on the lower side. It seems like every single person that owns a pickup a truck also owns a plow. I ran into one snow plow driver, truck falling apart, plow was a POS, couldnt get his blade to raise, then the battery died, he said he only does this in the winter time for a little extra cash, carrys just the min on auto truck insurance and no libialty insurance....and it's these people winning all the bids in my area. But yet when someone like me turns in bid, with a good looking, well taken care of truck and plow, carrying 2 million dollar insurance policy, truck and libialty insurance I'm loosing all my bids. Now if it was me in need of snow plow services and someone came into my business with there truck falling apart, completly rusted out pretty much I'm sorry I would have to pass, guess first impression means something to me but I guess to others saving a buck means more.
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