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rich p
12-17-2005, 08:21 AM
Where I work, we bought a new company truck(2005 F 350) and my boss is always screaming that when he hooks up the plow (9' MMII), The truck is always too low to mount. I don't use the truck and try not to get involved, as the truck I plow with has the old speed cast style. Is there a way to adjust height of frame to match truck height better? Thanks for any help.

Antnee77
12-17-2005, 08:25 AM
It is too low, even with the jack stand in the lowest position???

echovalley
12-17-2005, 09:42 AM
Where I work, we bought a new company truck(2005 F 350) and my boss is always screaming that when he hooks up the plow (9' MMII), The truck is always too low to mount. I don't use the truck and try not to get involved, as the truck I plow with has the old speed cast style. Is there a way to adjust height of frame to match truck height better? Thanks for any help.
The problem with the MM[as i have a few].When you disconnect the blade if you change ANYTHING about the truck from when you last disconnect such as loading your sander first then trying to hook it up or if the plow is not on pavement and the blade sinks alittle into the mud,also make sure the piston is completly retracked so you have plenty of chain slack to work with.

Antnee77
12-17-2005, 10:11 AM
Oh yeah, I forgot about that one: Manually compress the lift piston all the way after lowering the blade before you detach the blade.

rich p
12-19-2005, 11:22 AM
I was looking at the plow setup today and wondered why you need the lift ram compressed before unhooking. The stand is like fifth hole from top. Is there a way to adjust if it falls between holes? Thanks.

grassmanvt
01-02-2006, 07:39 PM
I was looking at the plow setup today and wondered why you need the lift ram compressed before unhooking. The stand is like fifth hole from top. Is there a way to adjust if it falls between holes? Thanks.

The ram needs to be compressed to allow slack in the chain so if you are not at the perfect height, you can push on the headgear to get the pins to snap into position. This is why on the newer (mm2) style there is a cable retractor to pull the lift arm down so you don't have to. Also note that it has to be in float mode to do this. It could also be that the plow was not correctly adjsted to the truck when first installed but usually hookup problems are because of operator error. The older style also had a leverage bar so you could pre-load the jackstand which was also handy if you used it right. On the newer style you really shouldn't need it.

DeereFarmer
01-02-2006, 08:24 PM
When I fist got mine, I did not press the triangle down as far as it would got for the first few times. What a pain to get it back on! An hour and a half later, it was on. It only gets easier from there. Good luck!:waving:

justme-
01-04-2006, 11:28 AM
I was looking at the plow setup today and wondered why you need the lift ram compressed before unhooking. The stand is like fifth hole from top. Is there a way to adjust if it falls between holes? Thanks.
no- no need. With the lift arm fully compressed (the yellow triangle) drop the support leg, now PUSH the headgear back TOWARDS the truck this will raise the headgear a little- almost always enough to get the jack leg to lock in the next lowest hole. NOW it's at the proper height. Even if you did set the jack 1 hole higher (leaving the frame a little lower) you can still remount farily easy- you just need to push the headgear back against the truck harder- lifting the headger a little more. you may also need to pull the headgear forward- toward the blade which raises the mounting points up high enough to catch in the truck pushplates.

Except for sinking in mud all MM mounting problems are operator error. Odds are you're boss doesn't know how to put it on properly, and I would also presume whoever regularly takes it off isn;t doing IT correctly either.

If the height of the vehicle has changed significantly from that of when it was demounted last there will be a problem, but we're talking a couple inches of difference.

I usually drop mine on 3 pieces of 2x8x8 - 2 under the edge 1 under the jack leg. That always keeps it from sinking too much to remount.

Once you get the hang of a MM system it's a breeze. I almost always tilt the headgear forward before mounting as a precausion. When I first got this truck it took me twice as long to mount the MM1 as it did the old Speedcaster- now the only hard part is lining up the push plates.

danno
01-07-2006, 05:54 PM
I have the same problem with my mm1. Another good tip is grease the sh*t out of the mounting pins so they will slide better when trying to pull`em out.

RJ snow
02-01-2006, 04:04 PM
Where I work, we bought a new company truck(2005 F 350) and my boss is always screaming that when he hooks up the plow (9' MMII), The truck is always too low to mount. I don't use the truck and try not to get involved, as the truck I plow with has the old speed cast style. Is there a way to adjust height of frame to match truck height better? Thanks for any help.

Is the truck unloaded lower than the plow or is it higher? Seems to me that after un-hooking the plow that the truck would be higher since you just lifted 600-700 off the front suspension. I would try making sure that the jack stand is as far down as possible before unlatching the plow the rest of the way. Most of the time the problem is exactly reverse of yours. Either way though you should keep a close eye on the jack stand setting when you dismount.

justme-
02-02-2006, 08:59 AM
Seems to me that after un-hooking the plow that the truck would be higher since you just lifted 600-700 off the front suspension. I would try making sure that the jack stand is as far down as possible before unlatching the plow the rest of the way. Most of the time the problem is exactly reverse of yours. Either way though you should keep a close eye on the jack stand setting when you dismount.
When the blade is down there is very little weight on th truck frame- maybe 200 lbs. When you follow the directions for mounting and dismounting (push the headgear toward the truck and drop the jack leg) it self adjusts for the proper height and removes the rest of the weight from the truck- there is no raise of the frame from the plow weight being removed at that point.

danno
02-02-2006, 11:59 AM
When the blade is down there is very little weight on th truck frame- maybe 200 lbs. When you follow the directions for mounting and dismounting (push the headgear toward the truck and drop the jack leg) it self adjusts for the proper height and removes the rest of the weight from the truck- there is no raise of the frame from the plow weight being removed at that point.

I have the same trouble with "alignment" of the jack. When I drop it, the pin for the jack is "between" holes. I`ve tried pushing on the head gear to "lock" the jack in. Still too hard to accomplish. So all the weight is still on the truck.
There is no way you can push on the head gear AND reach around to try to pull the pins out at the same time. I even tried putting a 1/2" chock under the jack when it drops.

What seems to work is, I cut a 2X4 a little longer than the length from the front point of the triangle, to the back edge of the blade.

I wedge it between, and that seems to relieve pressure off the pins.

NOW, getting back to what JUSTME said. Since there is nothing "supporting" all the weight, because the jack isn`t "locked in", (between the holes), it`s impossible to push.

douglasl330
02-02-2006, 10:15 PM
Once you've done it a couple of times you'll get the hang of it. Just me is correct in there is little to no wieght on the front end when removing, so this shouldn't make inches of difference! If it's removed properly, like the instructions on the blade state and it's on hard level ground, reinstalling it should be a breeze--Just practice!--The speedcast is lighter to throw around, but the mm is easier once you know what your doing!

justme-
02-03-2006, 09:08 AM
Danno- yes, it IS possible to do it as I said- I do it every storm. And I just had my wife do it on her own with only verbal instruction the beginning of the week because I have some bruised ribs and could hardly walk (but the route had to be done...)

Make sure the lift ram is fully retracted before trying to do anything else, leave the lever in down float then get out and push the ram down all they way. MM2's have a cable and spring doing this for you.

When the moldboard is on the ground 90% of the plows weight is on the ground, with the lift ram properly retracted and plenty of slack in your carry chain pull the lever to drop the jack leg, then get in front of the moldboard facing the truck and push back on the center cross bar between the plow lights to lift if back and let the jack leg drop down to the next hole.

IF you cannot push it back far enough the surface you are on IS NOT FLAT so you need to raise the blade and put a couple of blocks under it. I have to do that every year mid season- 2 blocks of 2 x 6 x 8- one under each spring mount on the blade to gain back to lever with the truck. (it's not that there's still weight on the truck, it's that the lift chain is too tight to allow you to push back the headgear)

Now to pull the pins stand behind the moldboard, bend down to pull the pin and use your shoulder to push the headgear back toward the truck (against the steel angle UNDER the light) you can push and pull the pin. I find it'seasier doing the driver side because I am a righty. The only reason I push with my shoulder is my arms are too short to reach the pin otherwise. It works- you just have to play around with the idea and directions until your body finds the system.

A 2x4 wedged as a lever CAN work, but if you do it correctly you don't need it. Often when I drop on solid pavement (unusual- normally it's the front lawn) once the jack leg is set correctly there is no weight on the pins at all so no pushing back to pull them out.

I would be happy to meet you and work out the problem you're having, but you're about 3 hours south of me.

danno
02-03-2006, 09:20 AM
Thanks, justme, I drop the blade on my driveway, so its fairly level. I release the jack.
Then I push down on the headgear to give slack in the chain.

Going to the front, I push on the frame between the lights to "try" to get the jack "locked in", but for some reason, it seems like its not enough to lock the jack into the next hole.

RJ snow
02-03-2006, 10:25 AM
When the blade is down there is very little weight on th truck frame- maybe 200 lbs. When you follow the directions for mounting and dismounting (push the headgear toward the truck and drop the jack leg) it self adjusts for the proper height and removes the rest of the weight from the truck- there is no raise of the frame from the plow weight being removed at that point.

I have to disagree with you there I relize that after unloading the plow the weight is off the suspension to dismount but any decent suspension will have a little rise after that because once your suspension settles in with the plow weight, it will re-settle with out at a higher curb height. get out your measurin stick and check for your self. my truck does...about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch every time. of course i'm workin with new springs and such but that should be pretty much consistant across the board unless you have completely shot front springs.

RJ snow
02-03-2006, 11:33 AM
So as to not cause an argument with the elder posters here, Being a Dodge Ram owner...1500 I want to let you know that with a stock front suspension you have front coil springs rated at 1270# and the timbrens in it to help support the extra weight while loaded. Here's a test for ya, Check your riding height (measure from the center of your hub to the fender well on both sides) with your plow loaded. then drop the plow and check you ride height again (before driving it anywhere). Ok now hop in your truck and drive around town for awhile hit some bumps and then return to you drive way and check your riding height again. My guess would be that it increases through each step. Why???? because the Dodge front coils are under rated for a RD 7.5 which is why you needed the timbrens. But after the weight is off you drive around and the suspension resettles in at the normal riding height again, and that will be higher than the riding height when you drove into your parking spot to unload your plow. Despite what you may think..when the weight is off your front end removing the plow the suspension is NOT i repeat is NOT settled to riding height imediately after removing the plow which is why it seems that the plow is always too low when you return to put it back on. Timbrens use compessed air and what happens to compressed air after a load is removed and tempertures warm up, it expands right therefore raising your riding height while not dramaticly but enough to piss ya off when you return to install your plow, what the other guys here are saying is a correct fix to your temorary problem it will still give you troubles in the future as your suspension gets weaker. The cure.... Well get out your check-book and go to your local dodge dealer and order part# 52039024 Front coil springs. about $175-200 a pair depending on who your dealer is. This is a different load rated spring that will bolt in without any modification. They will raise the riding height about 3/4 of an inch and will also support the weight of the plow without the timbrens. (They are rated for I think 1760# or 1670#) what you will notice is that you will get a more of a "trucky ride" comfort wise as opposed to the wimpy stock springs but you won't have that problem with your ride height changing so much. in fact the front end will only drop about an inch when fully loaded with the plow. The advantage is when properly counter weighted with about 400#-450# ballast in the rear the truck will set nicely and all your power will be to the ground. When unloaded and no ballast the truck will still sit level (eliminating the 2" lower front riding height as from the factory, no need for a front leveling kit). What this eliminates is the need for the timbrens to support the extra weight and maintains proper riding height with minimal squat in the front end while loaded
As I said I did this to my Ram with excellent results. My reccomendation to your problem is to do what the other guys here say to, untill you can set up your truck the correct way. You mention that you have a 3" lift..then a set of front springs won't be any problem at all. Give it a try you'll be glad you did. The differnc in price is only about $20 between Timbren and a set of Front coils. The difference is weather you mask the problem or fix it. :waving:

bobingardner
02-03-2006, 07:18 PM
When I was looking for my first plow I tried to anticipate what problems each one would present to a novice. One thing that came to mind was how hard would it be for someone who's never done it before to install this plow? For that and other reasons I chose the Fisher 760LD. I can't screw up the dismount bad enough so that it takes more than 10 minutes putting it back on. That includes, and I've done this, forgetting to drop the jack before disconnecting the plow. But that's not my point. My point is I've gotten a some good tips from this thread and if my plans to get a bigger plow materialize next year I'll be ready. Thanks. :drinkup:

danno
02-04-2006, 08:58 AM
So as to not cause an argument with the elder posters here, Being a Dodge Ram owner...1500 I want to let you know that with a stock front suspension you have front coil springs rated at 1270# and the timbrens in it to help support the extra weight while loaded. Here's a test for ya, Check your riding height (measure from the center of your hub to the fender well on both sides) with your plow loaded. then drop the plow and check you ride height again (before driving it anywhere). Ok now hop in your truck and drive around town for awhile hit some bumps and then return to you drive way and check your riding height again. My guess would be that it increases through each step. Why???? because the Dodge front coils are under rated for a RD 7.5 which is why you needed the timbrens. But after the weight is off you drive around and the suspension resettles in at the normal riding height again, and that will be higher than the riding height when you drove into your parking spot to unload your plow. Despite what you may think..when the weight is off your front end removing the plow the suspension is NOT i repeat is NOT settled to riding height imediately after removing the plow which is why it seems that the plow is always too low when you return to put it back on. Timbrens use compessed air and what happens to compressed air after a load is removed and tempertures warm up, it expands right therefore raising your riding height while not dramaticly but enough to piss ya off when you return to install your plow, what the other guys here are saying is a correct fix to your temorary problem it will still give you troubles in the future as your suspension gets weaker. The cure.... Well get out your check-book and go to your local dodge dealer and order part# 52039024 Front coil springs. about $175-200 a pair depending on who your dealer is. This is a different load rated spring that will bolt in without any modification. They will raise the riding height about 3/4 of an inch and will also support the weight of the plow without the timbrens. (They are rated for I think 1760# or 1670#) what you will notice is that you will get a more of a "trucky ride" comfort wise as opposed to the wimpy stock springs but you won't have that problem with your ride height changing so much. in fact the front end will only drop about an inch when fully loaded with the plow. The advantage is when properly counter weighted with about 400#-450# ballast in the rear the truck will set nicely and all your power will be to the ground. When unloaded and no ballast the truck will still sit level (eliminating the 2" lower front riding height as from the factory, no need for a front leveling kit). What this eliminates is the need for the timbrens to support the extra weight and maintains proper riding height with minimal squat in the front end while loaded
As I said I did this to my Ram with excellent results. My reccomendation to your problem is to do what the other guys here say to, untill you can set up your truck the correct way. You mention that you have a 3" lift..then a set of front springs won't be any problem at all. Give it a try you'll be glad you did. The differnc in price is only about $20 between Timbren and a set of Front coils. The difference is weather you mask the problem or fix it. :waving:

That`s very interesting ! I`m not sure how much of a difference it makes, but the truck also came with the "Plow Prep package", which include HD springs.

justme-
02-04-2006, 11:12 AM
Just a correction. Timbrens do NOT use air- timbrens are rubber elastomer they are consistant reguardless of air temp. check their website. To my knowledge there are no manufacturers making front airbags for Rams, the only front air suspension system I have seen requires custom fabrication and total replacement of the front coils with semi truck type airbags.

Danno- try doing the same thing again now with 2 pieces of 2x4 under the bottom of the blade to raise it up and give more slack in the chain.... let me know the results.

Incidentaly- the amount of suspension rise from removal of the blade before driving the vehicle and resettling the springs on my 96 2500 CTD with original springs and no modifications is less than 1/4 inch. After resettling it's about 1/2 inch- mind you the MM system accounts for it, it actually accounts for over 1 inch of difference by the pushplate ramps on the truck and plow frame- sometimes I have to pull the headgear toward the plow to raise the ramps on the plow frame before trying to drive in on extreme cases- like when the jack leg sinks in the mud. Remember when you drop the jack leg and have the pins out there is NO weight no the truck any longer.

danno
02-04-2006, 11:25 AM
JUSTME, I do put 2x4s under the blade. Actually, since we haven`t had any SNOW :angry: around here, its been a while since I last hooked up. But, I know I`ve tried

1) Drop blade

2) Push down Head Gear

3) Pull pin. Drop Jack

4) Push on frame between lights.

I know I pushed fairly hard to try to lock jack. I`ll try it again. I even tried putting a small plate under jack foot to try to "close the gap" on locking the jack pin.

justme-
02-05-2006, 05:06 PM
Danno, when you push back try to notice of the lift chain is what's stopping the headgear from going back- the lift chain may need to be adjusted (it may have been improperly adjusted on assembly- too short for example)

danno
02-05-2006, 08:17 PM
Danno, when you push back try to notice of the lift chain is what's stopping the headgear from going back- the lift chain may need to be adjusted (it may have been improperly adjusted on assembly- too short for example)

I might have checked, but will do next time, thanks.