PDA

View Full Version : how cold before you plug a diesel in?


trqjnky
11-20-2010, 08:00 PM
I'm going into my first winter with a diesel, and was wondering how cold it needs to be before you plug it in?

mces969
11-20-2010, 08:16 PM
I have a 2000 Excursion with a 7.3 powerstroke. I have never pluged it in,never had a problem. Keep it parked with the front end away from the wind. make sure you put additive in the fuel till your sure the fuel your buying is winterized. I would plug it in if it is below zero or if it has not been run in a few days.

Philbilly2
11-20-2010, 08:18 PM
What type of diesel.

My duramax: I plug that in under 10 degrees outside overnight
My 6.5: I plug that in under 32 degrees outside overnight

erkoehler
11-20-2010, 08:23 PM
My 6.0 diesel starts has started fine, the issue is that it takes forever to get heat if you don't plug it in! I usually plug it in if it is down below 20*.

exmark1
11-20-2010, 09:02 PM
My cummins has never been plugged in since I got it, my 7.3 Powerstrokes get plugged in when it gets to 15-20 degrees.

trqjnky
11-20-2010, 09:50 PM
04 cummins here.
I put addative in fuel every fill up. Made by p.s, also have the diesel 911 just in case.

Its been 28 here and trucks started fine so far.

fci
11-20-2010, 10:19 PM
I have a ford 6.0L that I plug in when its below 20. It is more piece of mind, when I have to start it at 4:00 am.

MarksTLC
11-20-2010, 10:50 PM
I don't plug it in unless it is below freezing. Makes it easier to start with the remote starter.

cosgo
11-20-2010, 11:18 PM
Make sure and dump some Howes in the tank.... cheap insurance. run it for a while too so that it gets in your lines and filters.

Rc2505
11-21-2010, 12:23 AM
I have a 6.5 in a 95 chevy 2500 that I never have to plug in, and I have a 444E in an International ( same as a 7.3 powerstroke) that I have to plug in if I am going to start it at all with the temps below 20 or so.

ajslands
11-21-2010, 01:43 AM
I'm going into my first winter with a diesel, and was wondering how cold it needs to be before you plug it in?

If you plug it now till march, it'll be realy easy to start

Koonta
11-21-2010, 03:08 AM
plugging in is a little easier on the the motor, I may plug my cummins in, but I use a timer and just heat 2-3 hrs before start-up, saves on the electric bill

lawnproslawncar
11-21-2010, 07:38 AM
Does a warm shop make it considered being plugged in? No, seriously I do it below 20 just for piece of mind. All three of the 6.0ltr powerstrokes start fine even below 0. Quality Interstate batteries are to thank for a good share of that.

Williams Ex Co
11-21-2010, 12:56 PM
I park inside the shop.... However if I need to leave the truck outside for any reason I usually plug them in at anything 20 degrees or below. I have started them down to 0 degrees w/o plugging in but I feel it is just so much easier on them when they are warm....

creativedesigns
11-21-2010, 01:15 PM
If you plug it now till march, it'll be realy easy to start

By far the Best answer yet! :nod: Those who say they don't plug their diesels don't understand that its better. Its kinda like taking cold showers....doesn't feel the same huh? :cool:

RandyB
11-21-2010, 04:55 PM
Hey all, new to the site not new to the plug or not to plug, got an '03 7.3 Stroker that is so cold blooded that any thing below 35 she goes on the hitchin' post. And I do feel it is easier on the motor anyway. So if I know I'm gonna need it I plug it in either the night before or just a couple hours before I head out. Which ever works out best.

badabing1512
11-21-2010, 05:02 PM
for a ford you should plug it in anything below 50, a duramax, anything below 0

cretebaby
11-21-2010, 05:06 PM
for a ford you should plug it in anything below 50, a duramax, anything below 0

Really? :rolleyes:

2COR517
11-21-2010, 07:36 PM
I expected your post to be about this......

I have a 2000 Excursion with a 7.3 powerstroke. I have never pluged it in,never had a problem. Keep it parked with the front end away from the wind. make sure you put additive in the fuel till your sure the fuel your buying is winterized. I would plug it in if it is below zero or if it has not been run in a few days.

But I understand why you commented on this....

for a ford you should plug it in anything below 50, a duramax, anything below 0

Both are equally entertaining :D

cretebaby
11-21-2010, 07:52 PM
I expected your post to be about this......



But I understand why you commented on this....



Both are equally entertaining :D

Who you talking to Willis?

alwayz-plowin
11-21-2010, 08:52 PM
I Really hope when u said this you mean the front (nose) is in/ under a parking structure/ garage tent thing or something similar like this (posted below!)


http://images.canadianlisted.com/nlarge/shelter-logic-10x20-autoshelter-instant-garage_4395095.jpg



i gotta say this might be a good idea for the trucks!
opposed to a shop! put a nice heater in it!


I have a 2000 Excursion with a 7.3 powerstroke. I have never pluged it in,never had a problem. Keep it parked with the front end away from the wind. make sure you put additive in the fuel till your sure the fuel your buying is winterized. I would plug it in if it is below zero or if it has not been run in a few days.

cotter
11-21-2010, 09:11 PM
95 PSD
I do not worry about it til about 20* and even then it is on a timer to kick on a few hours before I head out (and more about getting me heat faster). I have started it close to zero without being plugged in with no problems. Make sure that your glow plugs/relay are functioning and it is pretty much a non-issue, but must agree it would be easier on the truck/batteries if it is plugged in.
Chad

badabing1512
11-21-2010, 11:44 PM
Really? :rolleyes:

Yup a little bird told me :nod:

2COR517
11-22-2010, 06:59 AM
I have a 2000 Excursion with a 7.3 powerstroke. I have never pluged it in,never had a problem. Keep it parked with the front end away from the wind. make sure you put additive in the fuel till your sure the fuel your buying is winterized. I would plug it in if it is below zero or if it has not been run in a few days.

Why should he park with the nose away from the wind?

cretebaby
11-22-2010, 07:56 AM
Yup a little bird told me :nod:

You need a new bird.

Tubby's Snow Plowing
11-30-2010, 03:33 PM
Why should he park with the nose away from the wind?
The wind chill from a cold wind will freeze the fuel in the rail/injector. The fuel in the line and tank will be fine but the fuel in the engine compartment might freeze. Happened to me many times.

cretebaby
11-30-2010, 03:40 PM
:popcorn: .......................

JDiepstra
11-30-2010, 03:40 PM
So you think the wind chill temperature gets through to the fuel? I'm not a rocket scientist, but I doubt it. Someone please correct me with facts if I am wrong.

Let's see here... I'll get started.....


Wind Chill Information
http://media.mgbg.com/wrbl/images/weather/weatherwise/wind_chill.html
..."Does that mean wind chill can freeze things? No, wind chill cannot
freeze things, only the outdoor temperature can do that. No matter how
hard the wind blows, the temperature does not change. But wind does
make things cool off faster. For example, some people believe water
will freeze when the wind chill dips below freezing. But that isn?t
the case. Water will freeze only when the actual temperature dips
below freezing. But wind will help water freeze faster by removing
heat from the water, so wrap insulation around your exposed
pipes......[this was very interesting:]...There is little danger of
wind chill hurting you in our area because it?s tough to get frostbite
with windchills warmer than -20F. But if wind chills go below -70F,
skin will freeze in seconds..."

more http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview/id/605868.html

Tubby's Snow Plowing
11-30-2010, 03:52 PM
OK. Try this then.

Temperature above freezing.

High winds (40+mph) entering engine compartment from front.

Fuel was frozen in injectors.

Fuel in gas tank and gas lines were fine.

Explain that one to me.

JDiepstra
11-30-2010, 03:56 PM
OK. Try this then.

Temperature above freezing.

High winds (40+mph) entering engine compartment from front.

Fuel was frozen in injectors.

Fuel in gas tank and gas lines were fine.

Explain that one to me.

Thermometer broken. You're really trying to dispute facts with a silly little story?

miked9372
11-30-2010, 05:25 PM
anyone here run glow plugs on there diesel?

Reliable Snow and Ice
11-30-2010, 05:29 PM
anyone here run glow plugs on there diesel?

well 99% of modern diesel's use glow plugs or some other type of heating element to either warm up the cylinder or the air.
and I plug my truck in when the out side temp goes below 40 deg's i install a new block heater every few years... 25 bucks for the one's i get

JDiepstra
11-30-2010, 05:31 PM
anyone here run glow plugs on there diesel?

well 99% of modern diesel's use glow plugs and I plug my truck in when the out side temp goes below 40 deg's i install a new block heater every few years... 25 bucks for the one's i get

It is my understanding that GM and Ford use glow plugs. Dodge uses a grid heater.

Tubby's Snow Plowing
11-30-2010, 06:13 PM
Thermometer broken. You're really trying to dispute facts with a silly little story?

Not likely a faulty thermometer. Just trying to learn what happened if temp was above freezing yet fuel was frozen. Wind looks to be a factor here but you say it wasn't. So what was it then?

JDiepstra
11-30-2010, 06:19 PM
Not likely a faulty thermometer. Just trying to learn what happened if temp was above freezing yet fuel was frozen. Wind looks to be a factor here but you say it wasn't. So what was it then?

Hey man it's not me saying it, it's scientific data. I'm not smart enough for you to just take my word for it hahahahha. I don't know what happened. How do you know the fuel was frozen in the injector? Is it possible it had frozen overnight when temps dropped very low and them when you tried to start it at above freezing it had not yet thawed?

Also, I dont think diesel even starts to gel until about 18 to 20* or colder depending on what type of diesel it is so you probably had some water in the fuel system as well.

Reliable Snow and Ice
11-30-2010, 06:20 PM
well what type of diesel fuel was the truck running 100% diesel or was it a bio diesel blend....
bio diesel will gell at temp's below 25 deg F right now i'm still running 100% bio diesel and soon like in a few day's i'm going to start to blend it with kerosene and some diesel fuel.

mwalsh9152
11-30-2010, 06:26 PM
Ive found that every truck will be different. Especially anything with a glow plug, older glow plugs and batteries will make one truck have to plug in at 30, while my identical truck with new plugs and batteries will start at 0.

Engines will vary too, at my last job, all my co workers would have to plug in their trucks Cummins N14's when it would get down into the single digits or they would never start, while I could fire off my mechanical 3406 Cat at 5 below....it wasnt happy and was sure smokey, but it would start

Reliable Snow and Ice
11-30-2010, 07:58 PM
Ive found that every truck will be different. Especially anything with a glow plug, older glow plugs and batteries will make one truck have to plug in at 30, while my identical truck with new plugs and batteries will start at 0.

Engines will vary too, at my last job, all my co workers would have to plug in their trucks Cummins N14's when it would get down into the single digits or they would never start, while I could fire off my mechanical 3406 Cat at 5 below....it wasnt happy and was sure smokey, but it would start

very true but the whole idea behind keeping the engine warm one is starting and two is the engine will not use fuel as bad when warm compared to it being cold...

all the white smoke is unburned fuel which yeah it's not alot but you do that every day and you will notice your millage between fill up's will be lower.

now in my 86 i have installed an over ride button for turn on my glow plugs incase it's cold other wise when cold she doesnt want to start. now keeping my truck plugged in all winter long i can get 340 miles per fill up and if i don't plug it in i only get 250 cause of the fuel usage on warm up's.. and never just jump in a cold diesel and run down the road you could lock up the engine from it being cold.... have seen it happen to 3 power choke's in the past few years...

also when I plug in my block heater I also have a 1.5 amp trickle battery charger hooked up so the battery's get charged and the block stay's warm. when i get in the truck the engine temp is at 135 deg

greywynd
11-30-2010, 08:02 PM
I don't have any idea how well mine start in cold weather without being plugged in....as soon as it gets around or just below freezing, they get plugged in for at least a couple hours before starting them up. Too hard on starters turning that thick oil over, oil doesn't travel around as fast, and takes a lot longer to get up to temperature inside and under the hood.

Why add extra wear and tear on everything if you don't need to?

cretebaby
11-30-2010, 09:07 PM
Not likely a faulty thermometer. Just trying to learn what happened if temp was above freezing yet fuel was frozen. Wind looks to be a factor here but you say it wasn't. So what was it then?

As much as it pains me to agree with JD he is right here. Wind chill has no effect on objects other than the speed as to which they return to ambient temp. Water doesn't freeze unless the temp is below freezing point. Wind chill is only relevant to people (and animals).

bossplowguy
11-30-2010, 11:18 PM
I plug mine in when it's cold.....dont like waiting for heat. Just dont run your power cord accross the street.....right scotty?!? :laughing:

cretebaby
12-01-2010, 12:41 AM
Just dont run your power cord accross the street.....right scotty?!? :laughing:

Yup. :drinkup:

(Did I tell you about that? :confused:)

miked9372
12-01-2010, 08:22 PM
it's 18 F (-8 C) here and my two next door neighbors have there trucks idling right now i don't get why they just don't plug it in how much diesel do you use idling for a hour? in gallons

nvm An hour of idling time consumes about one gallon of diesel fuel.

cretebaby
12-01-2010, 08:35 PM
An hour of idling time consumes about one gallon of diesel fuel.

Try a 1/4 of that.

miked9372
12-01-2010, 08:53 PM
i know a 6 cylinder 4.0 liter engine uses 1.5 to 2.0 liters per hour at idle with every accessory turned off. i think thats not right got that off of a website

but i think its .5 gph about their

2COR517
12-01-2010, 09:40 PM
it's 18 F (-8 C) here and my two next door neighbors have there trucks idling right now i don't get why they just don't plug it in how much diesel do you use idling for a hour? in gallons

I think it depends on the engine?

nvm An hour of idling time consumes about one gallon of diesel fuel.

My Vortec 350 doesn't even use that much.

cretebaby
12-01-2010, 10:02 PM
i know a 6 cylinder 4.0 liter engine uses 1.5 to 2.0 liters per hour at idle with every accessory turned off. i think thats not right got that off of a website

but i think its .5 gph about their

We have a MF 265 with a 236 ci Perkins that only burns 2 gal an hour at full load.

I think it depends on the engine?


Ya think? :nod: